Highlighted
Active Level 2
Hello, 

I'm just wondering if the iris scanning feature on the S9 is harmful for the eye cells when using the iris scan, since your using rays to scan it
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
hello, iris scanners are perfectly normal for enhanced and biometric security these days. I have not heard of any rare cases where one's eyes got damaged due to an iris scanner. I work at the airport and when I go through security, we have to go through a biometric enhanced security clearance of either scanning the fingerprint or scanning of both iris. You can imagine how many employees work at the airport and go through CATSA airport security on a given week all scanning their iris or fingerprint and not once has anyone thought about this. So from experience, I think you would be ok! Smiling_Face

you can read more in here including Samsung's Safety Disclaimer

https://www.howtogeek.com/404731/are-ir-scanners-in-phones-bad-for-your-eyes/amp/#aoh=15795500765601...

View solution in original post

Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Expert Level 5
Here's the most relevant excerpt if you don't want to read it all:
"According to Renesas and Smartvisionlights, less than 10 seconds of visual exposure to near IR is classified as low risk. For the IR-LED in your phone to cause immediate damage to your eye, you would have to hold it 1mm away from your eye for 17 unbroken minutes. It isn’t possible to do this with a Galaxy or iPhone X, as both products limit IR exposures to 10 seconds, and they won’t emit IR light unless the device is 20cm from your head."

If you are concerned about long term effects, there isn't enough data unfortunately.

View solution in original post

Reply
Loading...
2 Comments
Highlighted
hello, iris scanners are perfectly normal for enhanced and biometric security these days. I have not heard of any rare cases where one's eyes got damaged due to an iris scanner. I work at the airport and when I go through security, we have to go through a biometric enhanced security clearance of either scanning the fingerprint or scanning of both iris. You can imagine how many employees work at the airport and go through CATSA airport security on a given week all scanning their iris or fingerprint and not once has anyone thought about this. So from experience, I think you would be ok! Smiling_Face

you can read more in here including Samsung's Safety Disclaimer

https://www.howtogeek.com/404731/are-ir-scanners-in-phones-bad-for-your-eyes/amp/#aoh=15795500765601...

View solution in original post

Reply
Loading...
Highlighted
Expert Level 5
Here's the most relevant excerpt if you don't want to read it all:
"According to Renesas and Smartvisionlights, less than 10 seconds of visual exposure to near IR is classified as low risk. For the IR-LED in your phone to cause immediate damage to your eye, you would have to hold it 1mm away from your eye for 17 unbroken minutes. It isn’t possible to do this with a Galaxy or iPhone X, as both products limit IR exposures to 10 seconds, and they won’t emit IR light unless the device is 20cm from your head."

If you are concerned about long term effects, there isn't enough data unfortunately.

View solution in original post

Reply
Loading...